Trucking Accidents and No-Zones

Trucking Accidents and No-Zones

Car accidents may inflict enough force to seriously injure someone, and on the worst cases, even kill someone. It is sad to say that trucks are even worse. Due to their sizes and weight, you really don’t want to get involved in an accident with these vehicles.

For this reason, both you and the truck driver should make the effort of avoiding truck accidents. Still, truck accidents happen in our roads, resulting into injuries, property damages, hospital bills, repair costs, and worst, funeral costs.

According to the website of the Clawson & Staubes, LLC: Injury Group, trucking accidents may happen because of various reasons, such as when the truck driver has become reckless, the truck has malfunctioned, or the trucking company has not been doing safe trucking practices. Whatever the reason may be, somebody is clearly at fault.

As a driver, you have no direct correlation with these reasons, so there is nothing you can really do about them. But there is one reason where you can play a part in – no-zones. No-zones are the blind spots of trucks. To prevent accidents associated with no-zones, both you and the truck driver should coordinate in the road.

This can be accomplished by knowing the no-zone spots of trucks first:

  • Front no-zone – Most trucks have elevated compartments, so their drivers have the tendency to not see what is directly in front of them.
  • Rear no-zone – Many trucks don’t have rearview mirrors, and even if they do, their view may be blocked by their cargos or trailers, so there is a possibility that truck drivers do not see what is directly behind them
  • Side no-zone – Trucks are typically long and narrow, so their drivers may not have full view of their length, especially on the passenger side.

Knowing the existence of these no-zones is important, because if you do, you can intentionally avoid them and prevent accidents that can be triggered by blind spots.

To avoid front no-zones, do not stay directly in front of trucks. Increase your speed a little to form a gap between your vehicle’s rear and the truck’s front side.

To avoid rear no-zones, do not tailgate trucks. You may even go below the truck in case of a collision. Also, make it a habit to drive a little slower in front of trucks, so you have time to react to unexpected brakes and turns.

To avoid side no-zones, it is best to not stay near the sides of trucks. If you cannot see the face of the truck driver directly or on the mirror, it is likely that the driver doesn’t see you as well.

According to the website of these Milwaukee car accident attorneys, those who have been injured in car accidents may have legal options. But of course, this doesn’t mean that drivers can do everything they want. They need to be safe on the roads regardless of the legal consequences, and they can do this by having a considerable distance from trucks.


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Chris Borland, a linebacker who was drafted by the San Francisco 49ers in the third round of the 2014 NFL Draft retired from the sport in March of 2015, making him “one of the first prominent NFL players to retire from professional football early in his career due to concerns over head injuries inherent to the sport.”

Borland’s concerns are based on the cases of three other NFL players, Dave Duerson, Mike “Iron Mike” Webster, and Ray Easterling who, after their deaths, were diagnosed with chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE), an injury that causes a breakdown in the brain. CTE, according to medical professionals, was most likely caused by the repeated blows to the head the three players suffered throughout their careers; CTE made these men experience intense suffering, often to the point of breakdown.

When he was asked to comment about the lawsuit filed by NFL players against the League for its obstruction of the research on the dangers of sustained, cumulative head trauma, Super Bowl winning quarterback and TV personality Jim McMahon said that he knew his shoulders, knees, and back, his whole body actually, would be beat up, however, nobody ever mentioned the head. Even football legend, Mike Ditka, whose whole life was football, said that, if he had a son, he wouldn’t tell him to play football: the risk is simply much worse than the reward.

Foe so long, the NFL denied any possible link between the sport and brain injuries or CTE. In 2014, however, it reversed course and settled a lawsuit filed by former NFL players amounting to more than $765 million; these players attribute their neurological problems to their time in the league. While NFL players may receive compensation, this is not the same for non-professionals, who played in college bu never made it to the NFL. Some of these former college players now also struggle with depression and short-term memory problems.
Football is a dangerous and violent game. It involves very strong and heavy players running into each other at full speed. The sad thing is, the more violent it is, the more fans, owners and camera crew are awestruck, not fully understanding these violent collisions can result to chronic brain damage and/or irrecoverable body impairment.

“During the 2015 season alone, there were over 180 reported concussions in the National Football League, an average of 10.7 concussions each week over the 17-week season. While there are safety protocols and rules in place to prevent head injuries, many of these are arbitrarily enforced by referees and team trainers alike. Often responsible parties will take negligent action in order to further the entertainment value of football games. Players frequently feel forced to perform despite incurring severe head injuries in order to retain their professional careers and fans. This is incredibly dangerous for players as repeated concussions have serious long-term effects on a person’s wellbeing, such as:

  • Reduced life span
  • High medical costs
  • Brain damage
  • Chronic headaches
  • Impaired concentration and memory
  • Reduced balance”

For those filing NFL concussion lawsuits, the NFL has approved a fund for settlements that players can apply to on their own. Without help from a seasoned lawyer, however, a player may not be able to receive the maximum compensation possible from the fund, which is $5 million. To receive this maximum amount, a player ought to be able to prove that he is experiencing certain long-term neurological injuries – a real challenge without legal help.


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Vehicular Homicide Explained

Driving while intoxicated is a serious offense that can have devastating consequences on the part of the driver. When it leads to the death of another person, the defendant could be charged with vehicular homicide. A Nashville criminal attorney Brent Horst will tell you that if a BAC that exceeds the limit of 0.08 and a fatal accident happens, that driver can be charged with vehicular homicide.

In order for a vehicular homicide case to be successful, the prosecutor must prove the following:

1. That the driver acted negligently while operating a motor vehicle causing the death of another person. If negligence was proven, the defendant may face an imprisonment of up to six months and the mandatory license suspension of 1 to 5 years.

2. That the death was the proximate result of committing a speeding offense in a construction zone. If proven, vehicle homicide is elevated into first degree misdemeanor and the driver can be subjected to a potential sentence of up to six months and a mandatory license suspension of 1 to 5 years.

3. Vehicular homicide becomes a fourth degree felony if any of the following conditions apply: 1) driving with no license or suspended license; 2) prior conviction of vehicular homicide or any traffic-related homicide, manslaughter, or assault offense. The driver could be subjected to 18 months in prison. The license suspension is elevated to 2 to 10 years in this situation.

4. If the driver has been previously convicted of a traffic-related murder, felonious assault, or attempted murder, the licenses will be suspended for three years to life.

In order to prove negligence on the part of the driver, the prosecutor must show that the driver understood but disregarded the fact that their driving presented a potential threat to others. Proving simple negligence will not suffice. The sentence for vehicular homicide will depend on how the offense is committed.


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Workers who get injured during the performance of their job, or those who develop an occupational illness, are entitled to file a claim with the Workers’ Compensation for financial benefits designed to cover lost wages, cost of medical treatment, rehabilitation and death (if the injury is fatal). There are times, though, when accidents occur while off the job or when an employee suddenly gets ill, suffers a temporary health problem, or undergoes surgery which would obviously result to days (or weeks) of recovery period – any of these will definitely cause a brief pause from work. It is during this time when short-term disability benefit become very important, as this will make up for the loss of regular income and so protect an employee from the possibility of falling into a crippling financial situation.

Short term disability, which may be employer-sponsored, paid by the employees themselves, or a combination of the two, is a special insurance benefit designed to cover lost wages due to injury or illness (which are not job-related). Since the injured or sick employee can use his/her sick and vacation leaves so as not to suffer loss of pay during the first few days of absence from work, the short term disability coverage has been designed to kick off after such leaves have all been used (coverage may be from day 1 to day 14 after the injury was sustained or after the illness began).

Some employers provide their employees the short-term disability insurance as a combination to long-term disability insurance. Employees who are not provided with this benefit may avail of it on their own. One important thing that employees need to realize about this special type of insurance is that it is different from (and is not meant to replace) Workers’ Compensation Insurance, which awards financial and medical support to individuals whose injury or illness is job-related.

As explained by Raleigh workers’ comp lawyers, many common workplace injuries, such as sprains and back injuries, require a rest period while a patient recovers. Many employees who earn hourly wages are concerned about losing much needed money, and may even force themselves to work when they should not. Well, the good news is, employees who need to take time off of work can be eligible to receive compensation which will cover part of their lost wages. Having a highly-skilled workers’ comp lawyer may enable an employee to be eligible to receive this financial benefit.


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Car accidents that involve pedestrians will surely be fatal. According to the Toronto personal injury lawyers of Mazin & Associates, PC, the result could be grave injury, permanent disability, or death of the driver, bystander, and others. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 4.735 pedestrians were killed in traffic crashes in 2013 alone. In addition, there were over 150,000 pedestrians that were injured and treated in emergency departments.

So when a pedestrian gets involved in a car accident what damages can they receive? While no amount of money can pay for the life that will be lost because of the injury or death, damages can help “make a person whole again,” as the saying in law goes. Here are some of the recoverable damages a pedestrian can receive in a car accident:

All states require vehicle owners to carry liability insurance to pay for personal injuries to third parties as well as payment for property damage to third parties. This will depend on whether the state where the accident happened follows the “no fault” clause. In these states, the insurance company shoulders the medical expenses and other costs, regardless of who was at fault.

If the pedestrian has auto insurance, they can still collect damages from their provider even if they are not driving when the accident happened. In some no fault states, there is a cap to the driver’s coverage. In other states, the driver’s insurance will shoulder the damages. If the driver has no insurance, then the pedestrian’s UIM or no fault coverage will pay for the losses.

However, the problem with mandatory coverage in no fault states as well as the UIM insurance is relatively low and does not pay for pain and suffering. For medical and lost income, there is a certain threshold and if that amount is reached, then the remaining amount will be collected from the defendant’s insurance company or from the defendant themselves.


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